Tag Archives: lake maintenance

Land And Lake Management

There is a lot of land in the United States That is not being used. Some of this land is native habitat and conservation land, and that is great. Such lands serve multiple purposes meeting important needs like preserving native habitats for maintaining biodiversity, wildlife preservation, erosion control, and aesthetics, to mention only a few. I consider this to be productive, and this is not what I am talking about.

The fact is, that much of the land mass of the United States is owned by people who do not use the land to produce anything, but who bought the land with some vague vestigial sense of an agrarian lifestyle, but who have little concept of what that entails. The same is true with ponds and lakes.

There is an indelible imprint on the human psyche urging us to posses land and live near water even though modern technology has solved most of our agricultural and water delivery needs in most of the western world. It is primal self-preservation which spurs us on.

I will be the first to say that there is nothing wrong with this, and in fact, it may be wise in the event of a tragedy of some type, (don’t think that such a tragedy cannot happen) but what do we do with that land, and those bodies of water if you are not quite ready or able to plow yourself right into farming?

People love being near lakes.

Even if you are just saving the land for the day when some great disaster strikes, or until retirement, whichever comes first, you can’t just let acres of land and water sit idle. They will revert, and what they revert to will not be pretty! They must be maintained, just as our homes and lawns must be maintained, and most of us lack the knowledge, skills, and equipment to handle more than an acre or two of land or water.

Your options are, to do nothing, to do the work yourself, to pay someone to do the work, or to find creative ways to handle the opportunity. That’s where Home And Garden Press can help!

In our sections on Land Management, and Lake Management, we deal with these issues, and offer advice and creative solutions for the perplexing problems of property owners.

Lake Management Websites | Aquaplant

Lake Management Websites | Aquaplant

There are some nice websites covering the topic of pond and lake management, many of them are university sites from the agricultural departments of large educational institutions encouraging fish production, or detailing the care and feeding of farm ponds for large farm animals. There are a few sites detailing lake management from the perspective of landowners seeking to control unwanted invasive weeds, or improve boating and recreational fishing, and there are sites dedicated specifiably to one aspect or another of pond and lake care.

The site I am going to tell you about is in the last category. It is a site which deals with aquatic plant life.

Aquaplant is subtitled “A Pond Manager Diagnostic Tool” , and that is what it is. It is, in fact, a very good one. The site covers lake weed identification, methods of control, and other relevant details. Their stated goal: This web site was designed to help pond owners and their advisors in the identification and management of aquatic vegetation.” The site accomplishes this goal admirably, and even more.

Usability

The tool is usable on a level that few sites even aspire to. In fact, as websites go, it is one of the best I have ever seen on any topic. If you are attempting to identify a plant, just click on “plant identification”. This will give 2 options: “Alphabetical Index”, or “Visual Index”. Clicking on the “Visual Index” will take you to a set of choices about the type of weed problem, and clicking one of these will take you to a series of photographs of individual plants from that category. Click on one, and you will find a description, and a link to more information, or treatment options.

The Information is first rate, and I can recommend it without hesitation. It is accurate, simple, and completely dependable.

Aquaplant Is a product of Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, and Texas A&M University.

Give the site a visit, and let us know what you think.

Aquaplant